Glass & Facade

We provide a wide range of glass for your needs in construction, energy or domestic appliance sectors. Facade contracting is another area we are expanding. Review summaries below and contact us for your specific needs

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Production of Flat Glass

Clear float glass

Tinted glass

Reflective glass

Low-e glass

Insulated glass

Laminated glass

Tempered glass

Mirror glass

Facade solutions

Production of Flat Glass

The plate process developed in 1848 by the British engineer Henry Bessemer was used for the production of flat glass until 1950’s. However, this process was an expensive method, since the plate process caused the glass to deteriorate and be marked, then these defects in the glass had to be polished and corrected. Sir Alastair Pilkington (1920-1995) invented the process of producing flat glass in the UK in 1952 and with his associate Kenneth Bickerstaff, spent seven years perfecting and patenting its commercially successful manufacture. A mixture of molten glass, traditionally made of silica, sodium carbonate, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide and aluminum oxide is poured into a molten tin bath. This results in a perfectly smooth glass strip that is equal to a flat thickness of 6.8 mm on both sides. This strip of glass makes it possible to form a thinner glass by stretching it when necessary. It is gradually cooled through the tin bath and then heat-treated in a long oven called lehr. This is necessary because if the glass is cooled too quickly, the pressure on the glass will increase more, which will cause the glass to break under the cutters.

A flat glass line can be approximately 500 meters long and 6,000 km of glass can be produced annually. Thanks to this innovative method, 970,000 tons of flat glass are produced every week in 370 flat glass factories around the world.

Clear float glass

Clear Float Glass is superior in quality when compared to other flat glass and has the unique characteristics of excellent surface finishing, flatness, uniform thickness, high optical quality and bright appearance. Float technology has been rapidly replacing plate and sheet facilities worldwide in recent decades. Float glass derives its name from the Float process used where the molten glass floats on the top of molten tin.

Advantages:

  • Smooth flat surface with good vision
  • Excellent optical performance
  • Stable chemical properties
  • Resistant to acid, alkaline and corrosion
  • Flexible size specifications, minimizing cutting loss

Application:

  • Windows and doors
  • Commercial and civil buildings
  • Exterior facade for commercial and residential buildings
  • Substrates for various compound glass

Tinted glass

Tinted float glass is produced by adding colourant during a clear float production run. The most common colours are grey, bronze, green and blue. Tinted float glass is primarily designed for solar control (reduction of the sun’s direct heat energy through the glass) which in turn reduces cooling energy costs. Glare reduction is also another important feature with tinted float glass. Tinted float glass is also referred to as a heat absorbing glass, meaning that the glass reflects little direct heat energy. Because of this heat absorbing quality, some thicker tints in certain situations may require heat strengthening or toughening to cope with this thermal stress.

Advantages:

  • Consistency in Color: We have strict tolerances on its colored glass and ensures through precisequality control that the tinted glass it makes is the same within a batch and across batches- year after year

Application:

  • Commercial and civil buildings
  • Interior decoration
  • Show windows
  • Automobile Specification

    Reflective glass

    Reflective glass is produced by coating one or more layers of metal or compound thin film on float glass. The major function of the coating is to control the reflection, transmission and absorption of direct solar radiation at desirable ratio, and to produce the needed reflective colors.

    Advantages

    • Effectively limit direct solar radiation transmission
    • Versatile reflective colors and excellent decoration effect
    • Excellent sight shielding effect on the indoor objects and structures
    • Proper visible light transmittance and reflectance
    • Lessen transmission of ultraviolet

       

      Low-e glass

      The Low-E glass produced by SSG is outstanding in energy efficiency and in aesthetics with various colors, thus being the primary choice in architectural design. Nowadays pursuing large daylighting glass area in architectural design becomes popular, and Low-E glass is widely used for energy efficiency consideration.

      Advantages:

      • Visible light transmittance— adequate indoor natural daylighting
      • Solar energy transmittance — a wide range of shading coefficient SC available, for different geological locations
      • High far infrared reflectance — low U-value, reduced thermal transfer due to temperature difference
      • Higher visible light transmittance — ensuring better natural lighting
      • Extremely low solar heat transmittance — effectively impeding solar heat radiation
      • Can be bent and post-tempered after coating
      • Has optical properties and energy efficiency as ordinary Low-E glass

         

        Insulated glass

        Insulated glass  consists of two or more glass window panes separated by a vacuum or gas-filled space to reduce heat transfer across a part of the building envelope. 

        Insulating glass units are manufactured with glass in range of thickness from 3 to 10 mm (1/8″ to 3/8″) or more in special applications. Laminated or tempered glass may also be used as part of the construction. Most units are produced with the same thickness of glass used on both panes but special applications such as acoustic attenuation or security may require wide ranges of thicknesses to be incorporated in the same unit.

           

          Laminated glass

           Laminated glass is a type of safety glass that holds together when shattered. In the event of breaking, it is held in place by an interlayer between its two or more layers of glass. The interlayer keeps the layers of glass bonded even when broken, and its high strength prevents the glass from breaking up into large sharp pieces. This produces a characteristic “spider web” cracking pattern when the impact is not enough to completely pierce the glass. 

          Laminated glass is normally used when there is a possibility of human impact or where the glass could fall if shattered and also for architectural applications. Skylight glazing and automobile windshields typically use laminated glass. In geographical areas requiring hurricane-resistant construction, laminated glass is often used in exterior storefronts, curtain walls and windows.

          Laminated glass is also used to increase the sound insulation rating of a window, where it significantly improves sound attenuation compared to monolithic glass panes of the same thickness. 

             

            Tempered glass

            Tempered or toughened glass is a type of safety glass processed by controlled thermal or chemical treatments to increase its strength compared with normal glass. Tempering puts the outer surfaces into compression and the interior into tension. Such stresses cause the glass, when broken, to crumble into small granular chunks instead of splintering into jagged shards as plate glass (a.k.a. annealed glass) does. The granular chunks are less likely to cause injury.

            As a result of its safety and strength, tempered glass is used in a variety of demanding applications, including passenger vehicle windows, shower doors, architectural glass doors and tables, refrigerator trays, mobile phone screen protectors, as a component of bulletproof glass, for diving masks, and various types of plates and cookware.

               

              Mirror glass

              There are many methods of glass to be coated with the chosen metal to form a mirror. In industrial productions, glass is coated by bringing the metal to a boil in special chambers and then metal is condensed on the glass sheet to form a thin but perfect coating of the metal. The back surface of the mirror is painted to prevent damage to the metal coating.

              Mirrors have to be specially designed in order to become effective, and the glass sheets that are used must be flat and durable. For household use, the thickness of the mirror is very important, with its strength increasing proportionately to its thickness. For heavy-duty mirrors and mirrors used in scientific research, the surface needs to be designed in particular way to retain uniformity while adding a curvature. This process gives the mirror the ability to focus as well as reflect light. The kind of coating to be used is specified by the mirror design. Durability and reflectivity are the most important characteristics in the choice of the coating.

                Facade solutions

                In the silicone facade cladding system, which emphasizes the simplicity and nobility of the glass, the heat glasses are attached to the facade with cassette profiles in which they are specially adhered. The Silicone Facade Coating System guarantees a tight seal with the roving safety at three points. Silicon Facade Cladding System, which is easy and fast to assemble, gains the appreciation of our customers with easy maintenance and ease of cleaning.

                In the Structural Silicone Facade Cladding System, when we look from the outside, there is no aluminum profile, and glass joints have 15 mm wide and 15 mm deep guga. Since the sealing between the glass panels is provided with double EPDM wick, sealing silicone is not drawn between the panels. Thus, shade formation between glass panels is prevented. Any glass panel selected (when it is not known which one is open) can be turned into a hidden wing when requested. Silicone is used between glass and aluminum panels, and component silicone is used between two glasses in double glass. The processes are kept under control within the framework of the quality control test procedures of the silicone company during the silicone removal processes.

                Structural Silicone Facade Cladding Systems

                Failure to use the outer cover causes the surface appearance to be perceived flat. The rich diversity of vertical profiles can directly respond to the required static, the needs of the designers, and the unorthodox.

                Vertical and horizontal profiles can be both face or different depth in internal view.